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Tuesday, February 27, 2018
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5:30pm [5:30pm] #FREEnewyork Rochester Town Hall
Description:
#FREEnewyork Rochester Town Hall On any given day, 25,000 New Yorkers are caged in county jails across our state. The abuse that occurs in these jails is rampant. Human rights violations, racial disparity, violence, and medical neglect are commonplace. Our jails are unjust, unsafe and inhumane. Despite a steady decrease in crime, numerous county jails have grown – some even doubling in size. In Monroe County alone jails 1,300+ people daily. Shamefully, 58% have not been convicted. The are legally innocent but caged because they cannot afford bail and trapped because their Constitutional rights to due process and a fair and speedy trial are routinely violated. This is a mockery of justice, and New Yorkers deserve better. No one should sit in jail because they cannot afford bail. No one should wait months or years for trial. No one should be denied critical information about their case. Join NYCLU, Enough is Enough, MetroJustice, SURJ, Action Together Rochester, Facing Race Embracing Equality and #FREEnewyork campaign for a Town Hall to: Discuss how jail injustice impacts our communities Hear from #FREEnewyork campaign leaders who have been directly impacted by our broken bail, speedy trial, and discovery laws Learn how you can help fight back against New York State's mass criminalization Take action to win real change Together, New Yorkers across the state are building a safer, more just world that invests in communities, not incarceration. Join us. Dinner + refreshments provided at 5:30pm. Main program 6-8pm. What is the #FREEnewyork campaign? With 110+ partner organizations representing 20+ counties, directly impacted membership across the state, and the support of more than 130 faith leaders, the #FREEnewyork campaign is shifting the political landscape to bring justice to communities that have been devastated by mass incarceration for far too long. Together, we are fighting for bold bail, speedy trial, and discovery legislation that decarcerates our jails and transforms our criminal justice system into one that is just, transparent, and equitable. Our work is driven by the voices of people directly impacted by mass incarceration. Learn more here. Partners Include: NYCLU, Enough is Enough, MetroJustice, SURJ, Action Together Rochester, Facing Race Embracing Equality https://www.facebook.com/events/145087829495300/

[5:30pm] Bail Reform Town Hall
Description:
Dear Community, 25,000+ New Yorkers are caged in county jails across our state each day. Monroe county alone jails 1,300+ people daily. Shamefully, 58% of the people jailed in Monroe county have not been convicted. They are legally innocent but caged because they cannot afford bail and trapped because their Constitutional rights to Due Process and a fair and speedy trial are routinely violated. This is a mockery of justice. To learn more and take action, join the #FREEnewyork campaign for a Rochester Town Hall. ● Learn and share about the painful impact of our jails and the policies that drive incarceration in Monroe county ● Elevate the voices of people and communities directly impacted by mass incarceration ● Join a powerful, statewide campaign for justice and fight back against New York’s broken bail, speedy trial, and discovery laws No one should sit in jail because they cannot afford bail. No one should wait months or years for trial. No one should be denied critical information about their case. The event is free and refreshments are provided. Sponsored locally by Action Together Rochester, FREE, ● RSVP here https://www.eventbrite.com/e/freenewyork-rochester-town-hall-tickets-43040836300 Enough Is Enough, Metro Justice, NYCLU, and SURJ ROC. Details ● Date: February 27th ● Time: 5:30-8pm (dinner @ 5:30pm; main program @ 6pm) ● Location: David Gantt Community Center, 700 North St, Rochester ● RSVP here https://www.eventbrite.com/e/freenewyork-rochester-town-hall-tickets-43040836300




[7:00pm] Public events from Enough is Enough, #FREEnewyork Rochester Town Hall
Description:
1. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Community demands independent Police Accountability Board with disciplinary power 2. Watch "July '64" a part of EIE's film and discussion series! 3. #FREEnewyork Rochester Town Hall 1. Community demands independent Police Accountability Board with disciplinary power Who: Enough Is Enough, supporting organizations, and the community with Jessenia Edgeston, Scean Gordon, Pastor Wanda Wilson, and Barbara Lacker-Ware speaking to the media. What: Jessenia Edgeston and Scean Gordon will share their experiences with police misconduct. In response to these and many similar incidents, Enough is Enough, supporting organizations, and members of the community call for a new Police Accountability Board with powers to investigate, adjudicate, and discipline Rochester police officers for misconduct, especially related to excessive use of force. The power of an independent body to impose discipline on police officers is essential for true police accountability. Despite misconceptions to the contrary, nothing in state law would prevent the proposed Police Accountability Board from disciplining officers. When: Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2018, 11:00 a.m. Where: Downtown United Presbyterian Church, 121 Fitzhugh St. N., Rochester, NY 14614 Why: In 2010, Robinn Turner, while reporting a crime, was picked up, slammed to the ground, and kneed in the back by a Rochester Police Department (RPD) officer; In 2011, Cardell Libbett ran from police and, while lying face down on the ground, was punched, kicked, and tased by six RPD officers; In 2013, Benny Warr, while waiting for a bus, was dumped out of his wheelchair, kicked and beaten by RPD officers; In 2013, Dwayne Ivery was beaten unconscious by an RPD officer after asking the officer to accompany him to his estranged girlfriend’s house to collect his belongings; In 2014, Quintin Keene was beaten by an RPD officer while talking on his phone in a laundromat; the officer claimed to be looking for a man with a gun who bore no resemblance to Keene; In 2015, Rasheed Griner, enjoying music at the beach, was beaten by an RPD officer ; In 2015, Scean Gordon was pepper-sprayed and beaten by RPD officers after video-recording the arrest of his friend who was misidentified by the officers; In 2016, Silvon Simmons was shot 3 times by an RPD officer who misidentified him as a suspect in an unrelated crime based merely on his race and the make/model of his car; In 2016, Lentorya Parker was slammed to the ground by an RPD officer after he asked her to go back into her yard and she turned to do so; In 2016, Rickey Bryant was beaten by several RPD officers after being mistaken for a man with a gun who bore no resemblance to him. All of these survivors of police brutality were unarmed. All are Black. Their lives were devalued and their bodies damaged. No officer was terminated as a result of a civilian allegations of excessive use of force from 2002-16, according to Professional Standards Section annual reports. These cases, and many others like them, are examples of why we need real accountability, transparency, and justice when dealing with police misconduct. Enough is Enough, supporting organizations, and members of the community call for a new Police Accountability Board with powers to investigate, adjudicate, and discipline Rochester police officers for misconduct, especially related to excessive use of force. In response to our call, City Council contracted with the Center for Governmental Research (CGR) to research the issue, and their report was presented to City Council in November, 2017. Members of Enough is Enough have reviewed the report and have identified concerns that warrant a response. Specifically: The power of an independent body to impose discipline on police officers is essential for true police accountability. Despite misconceptions to the contrary, New York State law does not preclude the proposed Police Accountability Board from disciplining officers. New York State Civil Service Law, § 75, explicitly acknowledges that an “officer or body,” such as the proposed Police Accountability Board, can have the power to discipline officers. Analysis of the current police review process should address the most serious civilian allegations: those of excessive force. From 2001 - 2016, Civilian Review Board Annual Reports reveal 929 such allegations, of which only 16 were ultimately sustained by the Chief of Police. From 2002 - 2016, no officer has been terminated due to a civilian allegation of excessive force (according to Professional Standards Section Annual Reports). Thus, the current system is not working and Rochester needs independent disciplinary power to achieve true accountability. We are proposing a Police Accountability Board with five essential powers: Independent investigative authority as an agency of city government independent from the RPD; Subpoena power to compel the production of evidence and witnesses; The authority to conduct misconduct hearings; Disciplinary authority; and The power to evaluate systemic patterns, practices, policies, and procedures of the RPD to recommend changes and prevent misconduct . We are hopeful that City Council will establish a PAB with all of the powers enumerated above, because justice requires accountability, and accountability requires independence. ### 2. Watch "July '64" a part of EIE's film and discussion series! Feb. 27, 7pm, Flying Squirrel (285 Clarissa St.), $5 suggested donation Over the next few months, EIE is going to be hosting several film events and discussions culminating in a (hopeful) panel discussion. The purpose is primarily educational: to highlight the similarities between Newark, NJ and Rochester, NY and show how one city, Newark, was able to pass its Civilian Complaint Review Board (CCRB), which essentially houses all the powers that activists and community members have been demanding for the last half century, and more recently in the proposed Police Accountability Board (PAB), in Rochester: 1. The PAB must be an agency of the city, independent of the Rochester Police Department (RPD); 2. The PAB must have independent investigative authority; 3. The PAB must have subpoena power; 4. The PAB must have disciplinary power over officers who are found to have committed misconduct; and 5. The PAB must have the authority to assess, review, and make changes to RPD policies and procedures. #ROC #BlackLivesMatter #EnoughIsEnough #PABNOW Watch "July '64" a part of EIE's film and discussion series 3. #FREEnewyork Rochester Town Hall On any given day, 25,000 New Yorkers are caged in county jails across our state. The abuse that occurs in these jails is rampant. Human rights violations, racial disparity, violence, and medical neglect are commonplace. Our jails are unjust, unsafe and inhumane. Despite a steady decrease in crime, numerous county jails have grown – some even doubling in size. In Monroe County alone jails 1,300+ people daily. Shamefully, 58% have not been convicted. The are legally innocent but caged because they cannot afford bail and trapped because their Constitutional rights to due process and a fair and speedy trial are routinely violated. This is a mockery of justice, and New Yorkers deserve better. No one should sit in jail because they cannot afford bail. No one should wait months or years for trial. No one should be denied critical information about their case. Join NYCLU, Enough is Enough, MetroJustice, SURJ, Action Together Rochester, Facing Race Embracing Equality and #FREEnewyork campaign for a Town Hall to: Discuss how jail injustice impacts our communities Hear from #FREEnewyork campaign leaders who have been directly impacted by our broken bail, speedy trial, and discovery laws Learn how you can help fight back against New York State's mass criminalization Take action to win real change Together, New Yorkers across the state are building a safer, more just world that invests in communities, not incarceration. Join us. Dinner + refreshments provided at 5:30pm. Main program 6-8pm. What is the #FREEnewyork campaign? With 110+ partner organizations representing 20+ counties, directly impacted membership across the state, and the support of more than 130 faith leaders, the #FREEnewyork campaign is shifting the political landscape to bring justice to communities that have been devastated by mass incarceration for far too long. Together, we are fighting for bold bail, speedy trial, and discovery legislation that decarcerates our jails and transforms our criminal justice system into one that is just, transparent, and equitable. Our work is driven by the voices of people directly impacted by mass incarceration. Learn more here. Partners Include: NYCLU, Enough is Enough, MetroJustice, SURJ, Action Together Rochester, Facing Race Embracing Equality https://www.facebook.com/events/145087829495300/

[7:00pm] Public events from Enough is Enough, Watch "July '64" a part of EIE's film and d
Description:
1. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Community demands independent Police Accountability Board with disciplinary power 2. Watch "July '64" a part of EIE's film and discussion series! 3. #FREEnewyork Rochester Town Hall 1. Community demands independent Police Accountability Board with disciplinary power Who: Enough Is Enough, supporting organizations, and the community with Jessenia Edgeston, Scean Gordon, Pastor Wanda Wilson, and Barbara Lacker-Ware speaking to the media. What: Jessenia Edgeston and Scean Gordon will share their experiences with police misconduct. In response to these and many similar incidents, Enough is Enough, supporting organizations, and members of the community call for a new Police Accountability Board with powers to investigate, adjudicate, and discipline Rochester police officers for misconduct, especially related to excessive use of force. The power of an independent body to impose discipline on police officers is essential for true police accountability. Despite misconceptions to the contrary, nothing in state law would prevent the proposed Police Accountability Board from disciplining officers. When: Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2018, 11:00 a.m. Where: Downtown United Presbyterian Church, 121 Fitzhugh St. N., Rochester, NY 14614 Why: In 2010, Robinn Turner, while reporting a crime, was picked up, slammed to the ground, and kneed in the back by a Rochester Police Department (RPD) officer; In 2011, Cardell Libbett ran from police and, while lying face down on the ground, was punched, kicked, and tased by six RPD officers; In 2013, Benny Warr, while waiting for a bus, was dumped out of his wheelchair, kicked and beaten by RPD officers; In 2013, Dwayne Ivery was beaten unconscious by an RPD officer after asking the officer to accompany him to his estranged girlfriend’s house to collect his belongings; In 2014, Quintin Keene was beaten by an RPD officer while talking on his phone in a laundromat; the officer claimed to be looking for a man with a gun who bore no resemblance to Keene; In 2015, Rasheed Griner, enjoying music at the beach, was beaten by an RPD officer ; In 2015, Scean Gordon was pepper-sprayed and beaten by RPD officers after video-recording the arrest of his friend who was misidentified by the officers; In 2016, Silvon Simmons was shot 3 times by an RPD officer who misidentified him as a suspect in an unrelated crime based merely on his race and the make/model of his car; In 2016, Lentorya Parker was slammed to the ground by an RPD officer after he asked her to go back into her yard and she turned to do so; In 2016, Rickey Bryant was beaten by several RPD officers after being mistaken for a man with a gun who bore no resemblance to him. All of these survivors of police brutality were unarmed. All are Black. Their lives were devalued and their bodies damaged. No officer was terminated as a result of a civilian allegations of excessive use of force from 2002-16, according to Professional Standards Section annual reports. These cases, and many others like them, are examples of why we need real accountability, transparency, and justice when dealing with police misconduct. Enough is Enough, supporting organizations, and members of the community call for a new Police Accountability Board with powers to investigate, adjudicate, and discipline Rochester police officers for misconduct, especially related to excessive use of force. In response to our call, City Council contracted with the Center for Governmental Research (CGR) to research the issue, and their report was presented to City Council in November, 2017. Members of Enough is Enough have reviewed the report and have identified concerns that warrant a response. Specifically: The power of an independent body to impose discipline on police officers is essential for true police accountability. Despite misconceptions to the contrary, New York State law does not preclude the proposed Police Accountability Board from disciplining officers. New York State Civil Service Law, § 75, explicitly acknowledges that an “officer or body,” such as the proposed Police Accountability Board, can have the power to discipline officers. Analysis of the current police review process should address the most serious civilian allegations: those of excessive force. From 2001 - 2016, Civilian Review Board Annual Reports reveal 929 such allegations, of which only 16 were ultimately sustained by the Chief of Police. From 2002 - 2016, no officer has been terminated due to a civilian allegation of excessive force (according to Professional Standards Section Annual Reports). Thus, the current system is not working and Rochester needs independent disciplinary power to achieve true accountability. We are proposing a Police Accountability Board with five essential powers: Independent investigative authority as an agency of city government independent from the RPD; Subpoena power to compel the production of evidence and witnesses; The authority to conduct misconduct hearings; Disciplinary authority; and The power to evaluate systemic patterns, practices, policies, and procedures of the RPD to recommend changes and prevent misconduct . We are hopeful that City Council will establish a PAB with all of the powers enumerated above, because justice requires accountability, and accountability requires independence. ### 2. Watch "July '64" a part of EIE's film and discussion series! Feb. 27, 7pm, Flying Squirrel (285 Clarissa St.), $5 suggested donation Over the next few months, EIE is going to be hosting several film events and discussions culminating in a (hopeful) panel discussion. The purpose is primarily educational: to highlight the similarities between Newark, NJ and Rochester, NY and show how one city, Newark, was able to pass its Civilian Complaint Review Board (CCRB), which essentially houses all the powers that activists and community members have been demanding for the last half century, and more recently in the proposed Police Accountability Board (PAB), in Rochester: 1. The PAB must be an agency of the city, independent of the Rochester Police Department (RPD); 2. The PAB must have independent investigative authority; 3. The PAB must have subpoena power; 4. The PAB must have disciplinary power over officers who are found to have committed misconduct; and 5. The PAB must have the authority to assess, review, and make changes to RPD policies and procedures. #ROC #BlackLivesMatter #EnoughIsEnough #PABNOW Watch "July '64" a part of EIE's film and discussion series

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